Melissa Bryan

IMG_1870

Crisalida celebrates 10 years!

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

November 2016 marks 10 years of Crisalida!

Crisalida relocated in August 2013 from previous premises on St Georges Road, Fitzroy North, having outgrown that space. Its new home features seven large therapy rooms, Group room, Gym, and outdoor space all conveniently located in the heart of vibrant Thornbury Village.

Ten years on, Crisalida remains true to its original values:

  • To provide a supportive, safe, and collaborative approach to child, adolescent, adult and family assessment and intervention, based in the Northern Region of Melbourne.
  • To privide a space for ongoing peer support and supervision.
  • To maintain a focus on high quality service, integrity and safety.
  • To ensure a comprehensive, team approach, allowing access to a range of clinical services.
Enquire now

 

Holiday Friendship Group Dates Announced for 2017!

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Hi,

Dates have been set for the 2017 holiday friendship group programs and we are taking enrolments for all sessions throughout the year.

DATES FOR 2017:

 

EASTER HOLIDAY GROUPS – Mon 3, Tues 4, Thurs 6, Fri 7 April 2017

JULY HOLIDAY GROUPS – Mon 3, Tues 4 , Thurs 6, Fri 7 July 2017

SEPT/OCT HOLIDAY GROUPS – Mon 2 Tues 3, Thurs 5, Fri 6 October 2017

Friendship Groups are a great entry point to In-term friendship groups or individual work with Crisalida therapists. Read more about the Crisalida Friendship Groups here.

Or, [button open_new_tab=”true” color=”Extra-Color-3″ size=”medium” url=”mailto:admin@crisalida.com.au” text=”Enquire now”].

 

10 Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew

Posted by | Autism | No Comments

excerpts taken from Ellen Notbohm‘s, Ten Things Every Child With Autism Wishes You Knew 2012

I am first and foremost a child – a child with autism.

My autism is only 1 aspect of my total character. It does not define me as a person.

My sensory perceptions are disordered

This means that everyday sights, sounds, smells, tastes and touches that you might not even notice, may be really painful for me. The very environment in which I live often seems hostile. I may appear withdrawn and seem belligerent to you, but I’m really just trying to defend myself.

Please remember to distinguish between “won’t” (I choose not to) and “can’t” (I am not able to). It isn’t that I don’t listen, it’s that I can’t understand you. Speak directly to me in plain words.

I am a concrete thinker and this means I interpret language very literally.

I often do not understand puns, double nuances or sarcasm.

It’s hard for me to tell you what I need when I don’t know the words to describe my feelings.

Please be patient with me. I may be hungry, frustrated, frightened or confused but right now those words are beyond my ability to express. Be alert for body language, withdrawal, agitation or other signs that something is wrong.

I am visually oriented

Please show me how to do something rather than just telling me. And please be prepared to show me many times. Lots of consistent repetition helps me learn.

I don’t need ‘fixing’.

Please focus and build on what I can do rather than what I can’t do. Look for my strengths and you will find them. There’s more than one “right” way to do most things.

Please help me with social interactions.

It may look like I don’t want to play with other kids, but sometimes it’s just that I simply don’t know how to start a conversation or enter a play situation. If you can encourage other children to invite me to join them, it may be that I’m delighted to be included.

Try to identify what triggers my meltdowns.

Meltdowns, blowups, tantrums or whatever you call them are even more horrid for me than they are for you. They occur because one or more of my senses has gone into overload. If you can figure out why my meltdowns occur, they can be prevented.

If you are a family member, please love me unconditionally.

Banish thoughts like: “If he would just…” “why can’t she…’ You didn’t fill every expectation of your parents and you wouldn’t like to be constantly reminded of it. I didn’t choose to have autism, and remember it’s happening to me, not you. With your support and guidance, the possibilities are broader than you might think. I promise you – I AM WORTH IT.

And finally work to view my autism as a different ability!

Look past what you might see as a limitation and see the gifts autism has given me.

Maybe I’m not good at eye contact or conversation, but have you noticed that I don’t lie or cheat at games.

And with my attention for fine detail and capacity for extraordinary focus, I might be the next Einstein, Mozart or Van Gogh…. They all had autism too.

(excerpts taken from Ellen Notbohm‘s, Ten Things Every Child With Autism Wishes You Knew 2012)

IMG_1904

Sensory Gym

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Sensory Processing difficulties affect 13% of children

Sensory Processing challenges can affect up to 13% of children, impacting on daily lives – difficulties with emotional and behavioural self-regulation, poor attention, struggles with learning and friendships, and so on. For example:

 

  • Children with Sensory modulation challenges may have difficulty grading the degree, intensity and nature of the response to sensory input.  Often the child’s responses do not fit the situation, interaction or environment.  The child may have difficulty finding and keeping to a good range of performance, and adapting to challenges in daily life.  Children may be generally over-reactive, under-reactive or have up-and-down levels of reactivity to sensation.
  • Sensory discrimination challenges are related to problems differentiating between sensory stimuli.  Children with these challenges may have a reduced ability to interpret or give meaning to the specific qualities of the stimuli, detect similarities and differences among stimuli, and to differentiate the time and spacial qualities of the sensory stimuli.
  • A child may also have sensory-based motor challenges include challenges related to posture and to praxis.

It is well known that children who have diagnoses of ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder often have sensory processing difficulties.   However, there is some exciting new research demonstrating that some children may just present with a Sensory Processing Disorder and how this impacts on brain development – read about this article in Bioscience Technology online.

 

Sensory Gym work can help!

Therapy involving therapeutic sensory experiences can be more effective than drugs, psychological analysis, or reward and punishment in helping the brain and body to develop optimally. Sensory Integration therapy in the custom-built Sensory Gym engages children with special equipment like platform swings, tunnels to climb through, big blocks to climb over, and trapeze to swing from. Under the guidance of a trained therapist, it is a safe, fun and adventurous way to enhance your child’s confidence and skills!!
IMG_1914

Crisalida offers Sensory Gym based Therapy for Sensory Processing Disorders with Therapists Trained in Sensory Integration

 

Occupational Therapy sessions enhance a child’s body confidence, co-ordination and ability to feel calm and grounded. Joint Speech Therapy and Occupational Therapy sessions provide an exciting and effective space to develop language, play, and communication, integrating motor and language skills.   Home and educational programs are designed to be family friendly and based on meaningful goals, with the aim of increasing happiness with life challenges and relationships.
[button open_new_tab=”true” color=”Extra-Color-3″ size=”medium” url=”mailto:admin@crisalida.com.au” text=”Enquire now”]
Reference: Kranowitz, C. (2003). The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun. Activities for Kids with Sensory Processing Disorder. New York: Perigee/Penquin

5 October 2013: Free Art Therapy Workshop for Mothers and Children

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Back by popular demand – the free Art Therapy workshop is on again!!

Gillian Hilton, Art Therapist, is offering a free workshop on Sat 5 October.

The group is an opportunity for people to witness and participate using Art Therapy methods and techniques. Read more about Art Therapy here.

This introductory workshop will use dyadic drawing and sand play therapy between mother and child, as a method of strengthening connection and communication between mother and child.

art therapy gillian

Who for: Mothers and their children.

Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm

Facilitator: Gillian Hilton, Registered and licensed Art Therapist.

Places Limited! RSVP to Gillian arttherapy42@icloud.com or 0401 932 356

About Gillian Hilton:

Gillian Hilton

Gillian has been working with children, adolescents, and adult client groups since 2007 in educational, clinical, forensic, disability and community settings.

Informed by her clinical research in the area, Gillian specialises in trauma focused treatment, having worked with civilian and returned service men and women with trauma symptoms, and people with complex mental health presentations in acute and secure extended care.

Gillian provides short and long term intervention for anxiety, depression, grief and loss and personality difficulties. Gillian uses Art Therapy assessment and intervention using methods such as visual art methods, sand play, and role-play to assist people to build awareness of their cognitive, emotional and behavioural patterns, and change them should they wish to.
Gillian is available for private consultation at Crisalida Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings. Other times could be negotiated depending on your availabilities. (Individual session : $105 p/ h; Group session: $ 55 p/ 1.5 h).

ALF

FREE WORKSHOP THIS SATURDAY: An Introduction to Art Therapy

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Gillian Hilton, Art Therapist, is offering a free workshop this Saturday, 14 Sept 2013.

The group is an opportunity for people to witness and participate using Art Therapy methods and techniques. Read more about Art Therapy here.

art therapy gillian

Who for: Open group, all welcome.

Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm

Facilitator: Gillian Hilton, Registered and licensed Art Therapist.

Places Limited! RSVP to Gillian arttherapy42@icloud.com or 0401 932 356

About Gillian Hilton:

Gillian Hilton

Gillian has been working with children, adolescents, and adult client groups since 2007 in educational, clinical, forensic, disability and community settings.

Informed by her clinical research in the area, Gillian specialises in trauma focused treatment, having worked with civilian and returned service men and women with trauma symptoms, and people with complex mental health presentations in acute and secure extended care.

Gillian provides short and long term intervention for anxiety, depression, grief and loss and personality difficulties. Gillian uses Art Therapy assessment and intervention using methods such as visual art methods, sand play, and role-play to assist people to build awareness of their cognitive, emotional and behavioural patterns, and change them should they wish to.
Gillian is available for private consultation at Crisalida Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings. Other times could be negotiated depending on your availabilities. (Individual session : $105 p/ h; Group session: $ 55 p/ 1.5 h).

Coming Soon: Single Session Clinic

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

 Crisalida will be piloting a Single Session Clinic, Monday nights. To enquire or refer, please phone Marisa on 03 9484 6299, or email intake@crisalida.com.au

Enquire now

What is Single Session Intervention?

A ‘Single Session Intervention’ is a longer than usual initial appointment with two clinicians and as many members of the family as possible. Often families find that the difficulties experienced by one person affects everyone in some way. We ask for the household to attend so we can brain storm solutions together. During the appointment we will discuss your current concerns and goals for the future and we will attempt to achieve as much as possible in this session. You will be provided with some initial feedback and recommendations to go away and try.

slider-3

 

What does it involve?

It involves pre-session contact with the family, a questionnaire to bring to the appointment, a one and a half-hour long appointment, and post-session phone-call. During the Single Session, the aim is to focus on the family’s priority of the most pressing concern.
If, at follow up, both client and therapist agree that further contact would be useful, the family is then offered either another single session, or the option of returning for further assessment with a clinician at Crisalida. Even if clients find the one session to provide enough help for the time being (this happens about half the time), clients can re-contact the service at any time in the future for further help.

How might it be helpful for you?

Clients and their families have found this process to be responsive and helpful. Families will have the opportunity to receive reflections and feedback from two clinicians, both of whom will have different theoretical backgrounds and skills to offer. A study by Boyan (1996), in a follow-up of 38 families, found that 81% of these families indicated that their single session was helpful, and 78% indicated that the problem that they had sought therapy for was ‘much improved’ or ‘a little improved’. Qualitative data suggests that families frequently valued the strategies and advice provided and the opportunity to talk and be listened to during their single session. *

Clinicians and families have reported to find it a collaborative and respectful way to work. Research results indicate that Single Session Interventions can be very effective at reducing the presenting problem and at increasing the family’s sense of coping (Campbell, 1999)**.

*Boyan, P. (1996) Clients’ perceptions of single session consultations as an option to waiting for family therapy. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 17, 85-96.

**Campbell, A. (1999) Single Session Interventions: An Example of Clinical Research in Practice. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 20 (4)183-194.

Enquire now
about

Crisalida offers the intensive SAS group program – solving the mysteries of social encounters!

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

SAS high five

The Secret Agent Society (SAS) Program uses exciting games and group activities to improve the social skills and emotional understanding of 8 to 12 year olds with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), including Aspergers Syndrome. This program can also be used for kids and teens presenting with anxiety. This comprehensive program helps therapists improve children’s emotional understanding and social skills by teaching them:

  • How to recognise simple and complex emotions in themselves and others.
  • How to express feelings in appropriate ways.
  • How to cope with feelings of anger and anxiety.
  • How to start, continue and end conversations and play activities with others.
  • How to tell the difference between friendly joking and mean teasing.
  • How to manage bullying.
  • How to cope with making mistakes.
  • How to handle new situations and ask for help when needed.
  • How to make friends.

For more information: www.sst-institute.net/au

The next SAS program offered at Crisalida is likely to be early in 2014, and Crisalida is currently registering possible participant names/details. We will have a free information session for all interested parents in late 2013 or early 2014, and then will decide on a ‘group’ depending on the best developmental fit. This is an intensive and comprehensive 12 week program, and runs over 2 terms, with follow up sessions months later. SAS requires both parents and children to fully commit to sessions, homework and school ‘missions’ to get the best out of the program.

Our therapists will help you work towards a meaningful, connected and happy life. Enquire now